Fuck Yeah, Southland Tales

A collection of theories, comments, images, and all sorts of other delightful things related to J. Richard Kelly's film, Southland Tales.

The World Ends With a Handshake: Unraveling the Apocalypse of 'Southland Tales'

It’s up!  I haven’t spoken about this (obviously), but Abraham Riesman has put together an impressive article on Southland Tales—I’ve been waiting on tenterhooks for July to arrive ever since I found out.  Go forth.  Read.  Enjoy.  It’s a great article written by a great guy about a lovely filmmaker and delightful movie.

cheremill:

Mesmerizing long shot from Richard Kelly’s much maligned, exceedingly ambitious post-9/11 epic Southland Tales.

I know I’ve reblogged this before, but I have to do it again, because I love this shot. It’s beautiful.

I can only hope that the answers will come to me in my sleep. I hope that when the world comes to an end I can breathe a sigh of relief, because there will be so much to look forward to.

—Donnie Darko (via robsblogparty)

behindtheillusions:

Bai Ling, Dwayne Johnson and director Richard Kelly on the set of Southland Tales (2006).

behindtheillusions:

Bai Ling, Dwayne Johnson and director Richard Kelly on the set of Southland Tales (2006).

screenmachinetv:

“This scene is totally narratively isolated from all the other scenes in the film, pays homage to concerns that are entirely external to the film, and engages in direct criticism of a number of cultural objects: star persona, pop music, masculine heterosexual objectification of women, and the drug-addled veterans of US military engagement … Yes, the narrative is bad, but it doesn’t matter. Kelly cuts to the core of character actors and generic styles in order to expose their radical potential for experimentation, and Southland Tales should be appreciated for this reason.”
— Robbie Fordyce, “TEXTUAL PROMISCUITY IS NOT A CRIME,” Screen Machine 3
Read the whole essay here.

screenmachinetv:

“This scene is totally narratively isolated from all the other scenes in the film, pays homage to concerns that are entirely external to the film, and engages in direct criticism of a number of cultural objects: star persona, pop music, masculine heterosexual objectification of women, and the drug-addled veterans of US military engagement … Yes, the narrative is bad, but it doesn’t matter. Kelly cuts to the core of character actors and generic styles in order to expose their radical potential for experimentation, and Southland Tales should be appreciated for this reason.”

— Robbie Fordyce, “TEXTUAL PROMISCUITY IS NOT A CRIME,” Screen Machine 3

Read the whole essay here.